Whats this?

chris pearson

Michigan Canoe Nut
OK, I know what it is, but who made it?
 

Attachments

  • pic1.JPG
    pic1.JPG
    79.3 KB · Views: 418
  • pi2.JPG
    pi2.JPG
    93.8 KB · Views: 422
  • pic3.JPG
    pic3.JPG
    83.4 KB · Views: 402
  • pic4.JPG
    pic4.JPG
    83.7 KB · Views: 429
  • pic5.JPG
    pic5.JPG
    86.4 KB · Views: 412
  • pic6.JPG
    pic6.JPG
    63.9 KB · Views: 410
Really thick ribs and pretty wide. As you can see, not much room between. I also forgot to mention that this canoe belonged to Paul deKruif, who was fairly famous back in the 20's and was a "bacteriologist and well known author. I've attached an article about his life. So, this canoe has an interesting background, be it heavy and clunky as it may. We need to find a good home for it. One possibility is to get it into the Holland, Michigan boat museum, which is currently in the collection building stage. If anyone has interest, or input, I'm all ears. The gentleman that currently owns it told me his daughter took care of Paul in his latter years and he gave the canoe to her husband. See the link below, very interesting......

http://www.aliciapatterson.org/APF2003/Henig/Henig.html
 
Chris,

How long and wide?
I once had a canoe like this. The one I had was about 19 feet, an odd ball all the way around. I never figured out the builder.
 
Peternut Ogilvy is my amateurish guess.
If I'm right next year buy me a Saranac;)
Has the right decks and seat frames etc
 
Good News, Bad News...

Good News: Andre about nailed it, its an Oglivy.

Bad News: I just learned Andre has bad taste in beer...

Greetings from Peterborough!
Dan
 
Hey! you come to Peterborough and dont call? Not that far to Killbear you know, you could always stick around fo another 10 days, I'm sure Lynn wouldnt mind ;)
 
Its got no thwart behind the bow seat. WTF? With the seat posts, the bolts went haywire. Dave would be great to see your photos.... What are these things suppose to weigh? 1 ton or 1 1/2 tons?
 
One more question. I see from prior posts that they did make these canoes without the forward thwart. Did they put the bow seat right under the gunwale, or did they use seat posts? As you can see, the canoe relaxed and the bolts angled in and ruined the gunwales.
 
Right under the Inwales. Thats a Chestnut trick but lots of Petes were similar.
The seat would make up for lack of thwart.
John
 
Chestnut Ogilvy..... Bow seat hanger bolts spreading like on Chris' photo. Wonder if the oversized wide ribs are pulling the gunwales out without a foreward thwart to keep the shape???
The stern seat is also hung below spacers. Appears to be "factory".
 

Attachments

  • seat.jpg
    seat.jpg
    189.9 KB · Views: 377
Dave Osborn said:
Chestnut Ogilvy..... Bow seat hanger bolts spreading like on Chris' photo. Wonder if the oversized wide ribs are pulling the gunwales out without a foreward thwart to keep the shape???
".

Probably so. Reply instructions say I need ten characters. I figure there is no end to characters in this forum.
Respectfully,

John
 
Thanks to all of you for the help. This canoe is going to go into the Holland, Michigan Boat Museum, if and when it opens. I think the tie of this canoe to Paul deKruif is significant for local historical value. He actually makes a small referance to the canoe in his autobiography "Sweeping Wind". Since there were no Holland based canoe companies that I know of, this would be a great excuse to get one into public view here on the "Big Lake".;)
 
Back
Top