Is this a Peterborough Canoe?? and what next?

va3mw

Canoeist, Photographer
All (hope I posted this in the right forum).

Long story, but this canoe was in the boat house of my future wife. It was covered with Glass, but, as you can see, we have removed that. The canoe is about 15'6" tip to tip, 12" from the centre thwart to the bottom, and 32 1/2" wide.

One of my neighbors tells me that it might be a Peterborough (not uncommon since we are just north of Peterborough Ontario). Sturgeon Lake had many canoes from Peterborough on the water. However, I can't seem to find any numbers to tell me if it is or isn't.

As this will likely stay a cottage canoe, and not ever be on a trip, I would like to refinish it, including removing the old varnish. I've done some reading on doing it in Canvass or Dacron. Both interest me, however, this would be my first restoration or recanvassing.

The purists will tell me to do it right and do it in canvass. Certainly, an excellent idea. Dacron would be good for the weight saving. Can I get it to the same level of durability??

I'm looking to draw from the experience here.

Mike
 

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Its hard to tell from these photos if it is a Peterborough. My gut instinct says that it isn't. Something about the deck, rib, and thwart shaping...but as I say, its hard to tell from these photos. The general look is right, though.

There were many other builders in the Peterborough area, could be on of those.

As it looks to be in pretty good shape overall, I'd start with stripping the interior. No fun, lots of grungy work, but it will be worthwhile in the long run. As is, the interior already looks pretty grungy.

Then attend to any woodwork as needed. Sand and revarnish the interior. I'd recommend canvas for a first time effort. Dacron has its advantages, but I don't think that its enough to tip the balance, given the goals as stated. Canvas is a pretty straight forward and forgiving option.
 
Mike,
Since you are north of Peterborough, might make sense to pay a visit to Dick Persson in Buckhorn - very good on canoe ID, especially the Canadian flavor. Dick is a frequent poster on these pages and may chime in.
 
canoe id

Mike, what numbers are stamped on either stem? thats a pretty good start and it doesnt look like its been refinished so they are likely still there ( if at all)
Likely either a Peterborough, Chestnut or Candian Canoe Co.
Andre
 
It looks like my chestnut 18ft, the painter attachment, the deck shape and the thick outwales. As to covering, dacron has largely supplanted cotton/canvas in most industry (clothing / underwear excepted) for good reason, and from someone who has done both, dacron is a lighter/stronger/easier choice, If you are doing a period restoration then canvas/ white lead filler/ lead paint(great colours). peter
 
Hi Mike,

Welll looks like a great canoe,, but its too bad you have already ruined it from what I see in the pictures. You removed the blue lawn chair web from the bow seat??? Whats with that?? :p
 
Hi Mike,

Welll looks like a great canoe,, but its too bad you have already ruined it from what I see in the pictures. You removed the blue lawn chair web from the bow seat??? Whats with that?? :p

She is a 1948 Peterborough Champlain. Too bad about the webbing, but it had to go!!

Here is what she looks like now:
932847263_zihKA-S-1.jpg


968703067_QzPpx-S-2.jpg


Dick in Buckhorn did the refinishing. She has done a few trips already this year. Paddles like a dream and carries a pretty good load. (I guess I was wrong about my earlier words about never going on a trip).

Mike
 
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