Good place to start

DaveHawk

Curious about Wooden Canoes
I was given this canoe by a friend who raises Fox Hunting Horses and the canoe was nibbled on. I do allot of conservation on this customers period furniture and so he asked me if I wanted it. After searching around on the net and seeing what guys are doing with these boats I thought it would be interesting to make this a father son project for the summer.

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as you can see I have some work to do. I just need to know where to start LOL

I could probably figure it out just by researching the boat and process but I like talking with actual craftsman.

I was told the canoe is dated 1910 ? Probably made in Maine and is a Old Town ?

I would like to add a after reading this afternoon allot good stuff on here. Do you apply a glue to the canvas or are staples what holds the canvas in place while painting? I found my answere;

http://forums.wcha.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=4236&d=1204601064

I am realy enjoying all the information here!


Thanks Dave
 
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Looks like a pre WWII Old Town (shape, seats, diamond bolts etc). Look on the stems for a serial number - it will be a 4, 5 or 6 digit number with a space and then a 2 digit number that corresponds to the nominal length of the canoe (16, 17, 18 etc) For help with the number, see http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?t=791

Post the number on the serial number search forum and we can get you a copy of the build record.

Welcome to the world of wooden canoes!
 
Mike Thanks for the reply.

I'm leaving to pick my son up from school tomorrow and will be bring the canoe home with me then. I will have the information this weekend.
 
Charlie Franks said:
Dave,

A good place to start is by getting a copy of the book "The Wood and Canvas Canoe" by Stelmok and Thurlow, You can order it from the online store here:

Seems strange that this book is next to last on the list of books for sale and on the second page where folks probably don't locate it. I wonder what it would take to get it moved to the top of the list on page one? Seems like it deserves to be front and center......................
 
MGC said:
Seems strange that this book is next to last on the list of books for sale and on the second page where folks probably don't locate it. I wonder what it would take to get it moved to the top of the list on page one? Seems like it deserves to be front and center......................

It's alphabetical by title. Not much we can do about it with the store software we are using...
 
MikeCav, here are the #'s

The #'s 89752 ... 16 I have the canoe in the shop and will get started on her soon.
 
Hello Dave,

89752 was assigned to a 16' Charles River model in CS (Common Sense) grade. It has open spruce rails, ash seats, decks and thwarts and came with a keel. It was originally painted dark green.

It was shipped to Abercrombie & Fitch in NYC on June 17, 1926. A copy of the build record is attached.

Scans of approximately 210,000 records were created with substantial grants from the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association (WCHA) and others. Additional information about the project to preserve these records is available at http://www.wcha.org/catalogs/old-town/records/ if you want more details. Please join WCHA or make a tax deductable contribution so that services like this can continue. See http://www.wcha.org/wcha/ to learn more about the WCHA, http://www.wcha.org/wcha_video.php to watch a 10 minute video about WCHA and our programs and http://www.wcha.org/join.html to join. If you are already a WCHA member, THANK YOU!

It is also possible that you could have another number or manufacturer if this description doesn't match your canoe. Feel free to reply here if you have any other questions.


Mike
 

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OT build record

Hi

following this forum for a while but didn't yet post anything... Here comes my first question (a bit off-topic):

I checked the build record in this thread and was wondering about the mentioning of two fillings. What was the habit back then? I just have finished filling my first WC-canoe after Stelmock/Thurlow two weeks ago, now it is slowly drying. Should I think of filling her a second time?

Thanks
Till
 
To fill or not to fill (again), that is the question

In Jerry's book he advises that you should fill two or even three times, but all at once before the drying process. Once you get the first coat rubbed in, you go back and do another and another coat until the canvas is filled and the filler is smooth in appearance. Use a paint roller to lay it on and a rubber glove to work it in. Then let it dry. Once it's dry and assuming it's filled you can begin sanding to prep for paint.

Can one of the seasoned vet's comment about adding filler after the filler is dried? I'm not sure that I would do that.
 
etilli33 said:
I checked the build record in this thread and was wondering about the mentioning of two fillings. What was the habit back then?

Yes, most of the old build records show two fillings about a month apart. A recent Kennebec record at http://forums.wcha.org/showthread.php?t=3314 shows three fillings. The current philosophy is usually to apply multiple coats over a shorter time period which may be due to changes in the filler ingredients over the years.

Benson
 
Thanks Mike, I will sign up later today after I get the shop in order for the week. It going to be a short week. I'm heading to Nigra for a salomon touriment on Friday.
 
While I usually fill in one session, I was forced once to do it in two. I found that the filler cured much faster when applied in two sessions. It left me wondering why I don't do it that way all the time.
 
I never get a complete filling in one application on furniture, When I was in college and we had to fill our canvas it sometimes would take 4 or 5 fillings. When adding jesso to a frame being prepaired for a water gilding job 5 coats of jesso is the norm for a smooth finish and 4-5 coat of the bowl [clay] on top to get a very smooth serfice for gilding. I have seen a few canoes with altra fine finishes on them and I dough that one coat of filling did the trick.
 
I know I am getting way ahead of myself but I would like to know was there much gilding used on canoes or should I stay original ?

BTW thanks for the Wooden Canoe latest issue.
 
In my opinion, the build record gives the canoe's history and shouldn't dictate something as simple as color choice... that original color was someone else's choice, and may not be what you would have chosen.

Those restoring canoes where no indication of original color exists choose a color or colors they like... and the same should be true for you. Otherwise, most w/c canoes would be various shades of green, or red.

Someone else may know "how much" would be appropriate for an Old Town Charles River... but here are a few canoes by Charles River builders, from last year's Assembly:
 

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