Filler problem

Keith P

Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes
Has anyone seen this before?? If you havn't it's filler. Since this was the first time I had ever filled canvas I didn't know that the stuff should be thicker then pea soup. I stirred and mixed and stirred some more and it still came out like _____. :mad: ARRRRGH. I also ran out.... Not sure what to do next. Any suggestions would be more then welcome.

Thanks,

Keith
 

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Hopefully you didn't wait, and cleaned up the interior with mineral spirits...

Those paint stirrers that chuck into your electric drill work well, but if your filler has been sitting a while, it does take a long time to get the silica back in suspension. It settles out quickly, and packs at the bottom really dense.

Given your canvassing woes, followed by the filler woes, I'm wondering if you used a really lightweight canvas?

Not sure what the best remedy is. If there is a lot of weave left to fill, you might just try ordering in some more filler and give it a second go 'round. If there is only a little weave left to fill, you might let it cure and then finish smoothing either with a 50/50 mixture of lightweight spackle and latex house primer (what we use after filling with ceconite), or a high-build primer from one of the marine paint manufacturers like Interlux. I'll be curious to see what others suggest, there are probably lots of ways to fix this.... In any case be sure to report back here what you decide to do.

Best,
Dan
 
The high build marine primer if there is a lot to fill or marine Acryl-Red Glazing Putty by 3M if you have a few spots.

Ric
 
The best way I have found to mix up that filler after all has settled on the bottom is put on some gloves and use your hands. That gets the silica back in suspension pretty quickly. My local Home Depot has also been willing to put a gallon can into the "shake it up" machine for nothing.
 
Like Jim, I use my hands. I tried sticks, and the drill attachment, but found that using your hands works the best. After I get the sediment broken up good, and find the bottom of the can, I then use the drill attachment to get the silex in suspension. You will have to pour and save about a third of the liquid out of the gallon can before you can get your mitts in there. Add it back in a little at a time when using the drill attachment. I also stir it a couple of times while doing the application of the filler on the canvas. The Silex settles out pretty quickly.
Good luck!
 
filler issue

Thanks for the suggestions. The filler was brand new. Recieved it from Bill two weeks ago. I went up to the local hardware and had it shoke up. When I was mixing it, there was only a small amount on the bottom. Hmmm. Is the filler normally this runny?? Dan I did get it cleaned up and your right I was using a lighter weight canvas. My Dad picked it up down in Florida. This has been one learning experiance after another. I think I will give Bill a call and see if he recomends putting more on if not I think I will look into the Interlux primer. For now it is 2000 miles and I will have to rely on my dad to finish up the filler. I will let everyone know what happens.
 
Next step on filling

I finally got a chance to talk to Bill. He was completely surprised that the filler had soaked through the canvas and ran down the inside of canoe. He recommended putting more filler on to finish it up. I guess this time I'll order up the leaded stuff.
 
Keith,

I tried mixing my own from one of the recipies listed on this site, and it came out with a very low viscosity, ie, runny, and not "creamy" as the other fillers I bought were. I was careful and didn't have it soak between the planks but it also didn't rub out smooth either. I top coated it with some Old Town filler I had which rubbed out fine. It took a long time for this canoe/filler to dry.

BTW, I've used 2 versions of Old Town filler and Rollin's and they all worked fine, and none have lead in them.

Dan
 
i've used the formula on this website on 5 canoes and have increased the blend to make about a gal.and a half. i do add extra flint to thicken the mix a bit but have had excellent results with every canoe. i can actually put on 4 coats if i'm careful. but usually only 3 are needed.
 
Jim Wilson said:
The best way I have found to mix up that filler after all has settled on the bottom is put on some gloves and use your hands. That gets the silica back in suspension pretty quickly. My local Home Depot has also been willing to put a gallon can into the "shake it up" machine for nothing.
Just a thought... what if the new can of filler is stored upside-down for a few days, that way all the silica is at the top when you open the can?
 
Seems like it should be a good idea. Actually, I've tried just that. I had a gallon that had been sitting in the shop for a year or so, and I turned it over to see if that would help. After about a week, I lost patience and mixed it up with my hands. Maybe if it hadn't been sitting for so long, I would have been more successful with it. Or maybe if I just waited longer.
 
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