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where to start.

Discussion in 'Strippers, Stitch-n-Glue, and Other Wood Composite' started by Kenthechef, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. Kenthechef

    Kenthechef New Member

    Got a15.5' wood and fiberglass canoe for $40 needs everything fixed but the wooden body. Where do I start. I will add pics when I figure out how to resize.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Kenthechef

    Kenthechef New Member

    pics

    Here are pics
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    I'd start with the device pictured below.

    If you are intent on restoring it, you'll have to deal with the repair issues and likely a bunch of rot, which will necessitate taking the fiberglass off so that you can make repairs, true up its shape and restore it to a condition ready to canvas again. Unless it holds significant value you'd have an easier time with a boat that was not fiberglassed. If you search the forums and youtube you'll find a few threads and videos dedicated to removing 'glass, then you can evaluate the work needed. Of course it can be done, it just depends on what sort of project you are looking for and for how long.
     

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  4. Fitz

    Fitz Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    I thought I was more of an optimist than Andre, but even I thought the match treatment might be best. Then I had second thoughts. If you want to learn all there is to know about restoring a canoe it might be a good project. By the time you are done you will be an accomplished canoe restorer. It will just take a lot of time and energy. Keep us posted on what you decide to do. There is a lot of help here.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Kenthechef

    Kenthechef New Member

    I will admit its more work than I planned. I have always wanted a wooden canoe, I am wiloing to put time and effort into it. I'm not looking to make it perfect just usable. One plus is the fiberglass is polyester resin I believe should come off easily. I plan to cover with epoxy fiberglass not fiber glass. My first question is if I take off the gunwales and remove the fiberglass do I put it on a form or how do I keep its shape.
     
  6. JClearwater

    JClearwater Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Ken,

    I hate to rain on your parade and dampen your enthusiasm but....you are looking at replacing both inwales and outwales, both decks, splicing in part of both stems (if not replacing them), at least one seat, likely a few ribs, rib tops and some planking. That's assuming you can get the fiberglass off. I suspect that by the time the fiberglass comes off you will have nothing left to work with. I have restored seven canoes and learned something new doing every one. If it were me that boat is beyond my skill set and I would let it go. Replacing inwales is a task not to be taken on by the faint of heart. If it has significant sentimental family value maybe it would be worth the effort but there are a lot of canoes out there to be had that need a lot less work and would be better for a first time restorer. You could probably read how to do all the tasks required by using the search feature above and asking questions. Good luck.

    Jim
     
  7. mccloud

    mccloud "Tiger Rag" back on the tidal Potomac In Memoriam

    I don't disagree with any of the previous posters, all of whom have more restoration experience than I do, but I have worked on a couple basket cases, though not so bad as yours. If you rip off all the remaining rotten wood, what is left of the support for the shape of the canoe will be lost. Getting the glass off a floppy shape will be more difficult than it usually is. So to answer your initial question about what to do first, if I were to take on the task you've set for yourself, I would cut a pair of new inwales and install them just a fraction of an inch below the existing rotten inwales. Then I would take a saws-all and cut off the old gunwales and attached rotten rib tips. Tieing the ends of the new inwales together temporarily will at least provide some solidity and maintain shape. Good luck. Tom McCloud
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Kenthechef

    Kenthechef New Member

    In spite of my better judgment and solid advice form knowledgeable people I am gonna go ahead. We shall see how far I get. I started removing the fiberglass, have to see whats underneath. I plan to half ass it to just get something to get on the water with.
     

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