Old Town Fiberglass

RobinH

Curious about Wooden Canoes
I have a canoe with 214251 embossed on the side and a riveted platte with XTC14251M77J Can anyone tell what model and year this represents? It iis a real tank and has been used for whitewater even with a fairly flat bottom.

Thank

Robin
 
Hi Robin--

The highest number in our database on CD is 210999, which dates from 1975. Old Town may be able to tell you something, if the canoe was built before they stopped keeping records on each individual canoe.

If you post a picture, someone may recognize the model.

Good Luck!

Kathy
 
It also....

Has a very warn tag on the side the looks like it says OTT____ or OLT____ and the ______ material from Old Town Canoe
 

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Looks like a trapper model, to me... newer version of the fifty-pounder... someone else may have more to add.

I'm not familiar with the significance of the other numbers/letters. Looks like a nice little "user" canoe.

Kathy
 
It was built in 1977 and it's not fiberglass. It's made from "Oltonar" which is Old Town's name for Royalex. Royalex is a Uniroyal prodect and it's a lamination of thin vinyl skins, inside and out, over layers of ABS plastic and a closed-cell foam core in the center. From the profile, it looks like a 17'2" Old Town Tripper (a somewhat heavy, but seaworthy tripping/whitewater-touring canoe). They're kind of bouncy on the bottom and slow in smooth water, but will carry a big load due to their depth. They were also popular as a big whitewater single when outfitted with flotation bags. The gunwales are rigid vinyl, the decks and seats are vacum-formed ABS plastic. 37" beam, 25" bow height, 15" depth in the middle. Catalog weight listed as 76 lbs. (most were closer to 80). Gunwales on these big ones are vinyl with an aluminum channel inside them.

It looks like somebody has modified the seats and lowered them (they weren't originally hung on bolts with spacers) and it looks like the stems have had Kevlar skid plates installed on them. This is good, because Trippers have sort of a big round area at the bottom of the stems that tends to abrade badly. The skid plates will stop this problem.
 
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