Old Town Canoes with Sponsons

SouthernKevlar

Curious about Wooden Canoes
I have noticed several posts and ads featuring Old Town canoes with sponsons. I was wondering on which models were sponsons an available option and during what years were they available? I have read the sponsons were above the waterline so as not to change the waterline beam, but wouldn't the additional width hinder paddling?
I have not seen one in person, but I am just curious about this permutation.
 
Sponsons were listed in the Old Town catalogs from 1901 to 1967. These could be added to almost any canoe or boat upon request. Many people did not know how to swim in the early 1900s so they were popular. They are usually above the waterline and the paddle stroke is much less vertical in a canoe with them. The link below shows several canoes with sponsons. Let me know if this doesn't answer your question. Thanks,

Benson


 
Thanks for the information. I was curious about them.
There is an Old Town Canoe with sponsons listed on Facebook Marketplace in Cary, NC. The ad does not note the model, only that is 75 years old and restored 15 years ago then put in storage. In the photos it looks to be in nice shape. They are asking $2800 if anyone is interested.
Along with the recent posts, this roused my curiosity about the sponsoned canoes and I just wanted to learn a bit about them. Thank you again.
 
1923 HW model I did last year
 

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That HW is a beauty, David. I was wondering though about the items attached to the sponsons amidships; are they oarlocks, attachments for a portage yoke or (my guess since it is set up for sail) an attachment point for line pulleys? I am having a bit of trouble telling on my small screen.
 
Quite often these canoes were tricked out with oarlocks. They were added to the tops of the sponsons.
Carrying these is not particularly easy due to the added weight. Consequently you will find carry handles near the decks on these and the similar Carleton models. The standard thwart is attached to the rails and used by burly men or women capable of shouldering these.
These tend to be camp or pond canoes in that they are not easily portaged. Or, wheels or trailers are used to shuffle them around.
Actually, the entire concept of the sponson is a bit comical. A swamped or dumped wooden canoe does not sink even without the sponsons. We used to put our canoes into the water all the time fooling around with gunwale pumping, sailing, jousting etc. What the sponsons do help with is that initial water grab when the rails get beyond the tumblehomes point of return.
 
This canoe was originally set up for sail. It does have the oarlocks. They sail it just for fun even though they can't find the rudder.
 

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The picture below from the 1927 catalog shows how sponson canoes were commonly rowed. The oar lock pads can be a disadvantage when sailing fast since they will throw a lot of spray when the leeward sponson hits the water line. Trailers and wheeled carts are the usual solutions to easily moving these canoes as MGC mentioned.

Benson

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Thanks Benson; nice find in the old catalog.

Thank you David for identifying the rectangular wood and metal parts amidships as oarlocks. I could not make it out on my screen and was wondering about them.
 
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