Help support the WCHA Forums by making a tax-deductible donation!

New guy with questions.

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by yeolwoodsman, May 24, 2008.

  1. jrghaven

    jrghaven Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Stem bands...

    The '67 OTC trapper I'm working on also has ?aluminum ?other steel color alloy instead of brass for the stem bands. Can't be steel, as it's not rusted. Did OTC change metal type for stem bands from time to time? There was a bit of an 'orangish' sheen on the outside in places, but I figured this was just old varnish wearing off and not a brass-like coating. The metal is quite bendable.
     
  2. Benson Gray

    Benson Gray Canoe History Enthusiast Staff Member

    Yes, Old Town started using aluminum stem bands in the 1960s and they were specifically mentioned on page 4 of the 1968 catalog.

    Benson
     
  3. jrghaven

    jrghaven Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks...

    Thanks Benson - the bands show a bit of age, but are in quite good condition. I plan on reusing them in the restoration.
     
  4. mark wismer

    mark wismer WCHA Member

    I stored my OTCA in my Mother In Laws garage in White Rock Lake for around ten years! She sold & moved away. I was married at St. Thomas on Berkshire Valley Rd...nice lakes & the Delaware is close!
     
  5. OP
    OP
    yeolwoodsman

    yeolwoodsman Rolf Warncke

    Hey Mark. I actually enjoy living on Lake Swananoa. My Otca came from a friend who got it from someone who use to have a house on the other side of the lake from me. I'm looking forward to being able to use it in the lake here again. Do you have any picture to share of your Otca?
     
  6. mark wismer

    mark wismer WCHA Member

    My wife's girlfriend lived @ Lake Swananoa on the east side near the mansion.

    It's a nice lake b/4 you add in the circus history.

    My avatar is the rear deck. Other pictures are here...Waaay back...
     
  7. Dan Miller

    Dan Miller cranky canoeist Staff Member

    And just what is wrong with the circus? Those of you who attended assembly last summer (or whose chapter got the DVD), may recall that the Waltham Boat and Canoe Co. had strong ties to the P.T. Barnham circus...

    And, the Baraboo River in Wisconsin, where it runs in front of Circus World Museum, is a fine place to paddle. And as one (former?) WCHA member discovered, you might even dredge up an elephant saddle.
     
  8. mark wismer

    mark wismer WCHA Member

    Then Walthams may have made it to NJ 'cause Lake Swananoa was winter quarters for Barnum & Bailey...
     
  9. Blue Viking

    Blue Viking Wooden Canoe Maniac

    Stem and inwale configuration

    I noticed that you asked if anyone had a picture of how the stem and inwales join on your OTCA...Didnt see any response...I asked that question awhile back and got the same thing...nothing!....Does anyone have a picture or can describe how they join at or under the deck? thanks in advance...the silence on this problem is deafening!....LOL
     
  10. Michael Grace

    Michael Grace Lifetime Member

    Here are a couple of photos from a canoe that a friend is working on down here in the jungle. Old Towns inwales come together at the tips of the decks. The stem is simply butted up under the inwale tips, and the inwales end flush with the stem face. Often a steel brad was driven down through inwale tip (or one in each tip) into the top of the stem. Very simple and straightforward.

    Michael
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Blue Viking

    Blue Viking Wooden Canoe Maniac

    Thanks Michael....by the way....that was a left handed joke a long time back....sorry if it offended you:eek: ....I used to have a place over in Haverhill on the west side of Military Road near W Palm. You do excellent work...saw some pics you posted and appreciate your input on here
     
  12. OP
    OP
    yeolwoodsman

    yeolwoodsman Rolf Warncke

    Thanks

    Thanks Michael, I really appreciate the pictures. The more I searched led me to believe that that would be how it gets done. I like simple, and it really can't get any easier than that.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    yeolwoodsman

    yeolwoodsman Rolf Warncke

    I'm back!

    What do you do if you have a bad morning at Home Depot. You forget about the job you were suppose to do and you go home and start working on the canoe. Nice!

    After months of looking at the canoe and moving it around the garage it was time to get to it. First order was a cart to move it around on. Then to begin stripping to see what's underneath what's left of the finish. Then to start removing one of the 4 broken ribs. The outwale that was still on it, and any of the planking with holes in it. What does this all lead to? Questions of course.

    I'm looking for thoughts on the following.

    1. The largest hole in the hull was created by a pipe that went through the hull and took out rib on the way through. (Two next to it are cracked as well but they will come later) When the rib tore away from the planks it leeft large holes where the nails. Will it be necessary to replace the planking thats still there with the holes in it? Photo 1 & 2

    2. The ends of the inwales are rotted several inches back. Would it be acceptable to scarf on a new section to the ends since the rest of the inwales are pretty good or will I need to replace the whole thing? Photo 3

    3. I've cut out the damaged planking. Is it acceptable to replace the sections as I've removed them, or would it be better to replace the whole plank the same size as the original?

    Once again I look forward to all the wonderful feedback. I thought once I started I would get discouraged by all that needs to get done, but getting started on this has actually been quite encouraging.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2008
  14. OP
    OP
    yeolwoodsman

    yeolwoodsman Rolf Warncke

    I'm having some trouble adding photos??? I'll keep trying.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 4, 2008

Share This Page