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Rough cedar OK if bead and coving?

Discussion in 'Strippers, Stitch-n-Glue, and Other Wood Composite' started by helgin, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. Dave Wermuth

    Dave Wermuth Who hid my paddle?

    Right

    Thanks Dan.
    I meant to say marketed by Piragis. (Built by Bell)

    I should think the Bell canoe would be a good alternative for one wanting a Seliga.

    I took lines from an old canoe and built a form. The canoe turned out to be a pretty nice paddler and fast. No idea how close it really is to the origional Penn Yan Guide tho. At any rate, I think I will shorten it to 17' from 18' for the next canoe.

    Apologies for going so far afield from the first post.
     
  2. Douglas Ingram

    Douglas Ingram Red River Canoe & Paddle

    I guess that I should add a few words, since it seems I opened up a sticky topic.

    Brad's comments ring true, but there is more to it.

    1. No need to bead and cove. As I mentioned earlier, if your edge molding is not perfect, you are in trouble.

    2. No need to do a rolling bevel.

    3. Edge glue all planks square edge. Sure, there will be some gaps, but mostly just along the bilge. A couple of well defined dark filled lines look better than random fills.

    4. Keep in mind that the inside will have very tight edges, and that's what you will have to look at while paddling. There is so much sanding in these boats, save it for where it counts.

    5. As you are going to paint the outside, focus on a good fairing job, not perfect surfacing. Scratch marks in the wood? Who cares? If you are fast enough, you can fair, fill, and glass all in one day.

    6. Outer stem? Why? skip it and build up some glass.

    7. The canoe is built to be used, no? So build it to use. The painted outside protects the glass well from UV, suffers wear and tear well, is easy to refinish to look great, and finally, when you bang into something you can say to yourself, "Its OK, its just paint. I can fix that no problem."

    8. Finally, aesthetically, a stripper canoe has so many pieces of wood showing that the eye has no idea where to look. All the fine detail gets lost in the noise. Its nice to have a relief, and the painted outside provides a nice foil, a contrast, to show off the fine wood work that you lavish on the interior and the trim.
     

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