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raising the seats

Discussion in 'Traditional All-Wood Construction' started by mccloud, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    This was the canoe I brought to Assembly this year. I put the seats in where I thought they originally had been, based on locations of screw holes in ribs, but after paddling it I have discovered that they are too low for me. I can't get my big feet underneath, so want to raise the seats by about 2". I see this as a dilemma. Do I remove the chocks, fill the holes with epoxy, drill new screw holes and put a new, wider chock into place? Or leave the existing chocks but add a riser to support the seats? Or something different? Tom McCloud
     

    Attached Files:

  2. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

     
  3. OP
    OP
    mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    Mike, There is no tumblehome, so the seats that are in it now will be about 3/4" too short if raised 2". It may not look quite right, but giving a try to a slightly wider riser will let me determine whether raising the seats is the solution I'm looking for. Tom McCloud
     
  4. MGC

    MGC Paddlephile

    Yeah...I kind of expected that. My WW opens up a bit near the rails and I sort of expected that yours might do the same.

    It's not a big deal to make a couple seats but it's even easier to buy a few that are pre-made. There is a shop in Vermont that sells pretty good seats for less money than my time and materials cost. To experiment it may be worth your while to do some shopping:
    http://www.edscanoe.com/canoeseats.html
    Not quite original but you can always put the old seats back in if you want to restore it.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    mccloud

    mccloud Wooden Canoe Maniac

    Risers it was. Cut out 4 of these, varnished, set on top of existing chocks, held in place with 2 x 1 1/4" brass screws. The seats are now 2" higher than before. Now I have to spend some time paddling this canoe and decide whether it solves the problem. The seats that you see were made by me. Tom McCloud
     

    Attached Files:

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