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Early 70's Picard

Discussion in 'Wood and Canvas' started by vtwoodworker, Feb 24, 2021.

  1. vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Some of you may have seen my dilemma about starting the work on an OT charles river vs. picking up a Picard because of hull shape....well I picked up the picard. Its in much better shape than the Charles river, but ovbiously needs some work. The owner told me he originally bought it in the Spring of 1974 at the Keewaydin canoe camp on Lake Temagami as the means to get into the Northern Ontario bush, where he spent a year. He is the original owner. I have not found a serial number anywhere. I'm wondering if it was an older boat the camp restored and sold for funds as I"m finding some iteresteing small patchwork repairs in the planking. It has some planking that needs to be addressed, probably half a stem replaced, a stem end, canvas, some gunwhale work and I"ve found 2 cracked ribs. The question is on planking. A lot is split, but still sound so I will be leaving it and just reclinching. But, some of the planking at the ends that needs to be replaced is over 6" wide!!!! can I just drop it to two 3" wide pieces, or do I need to stick with the wide planking? Also, theres one spot where a plank seam is litereally where a half rib is, which appears to have "Sprung" back and opened up the seam--what do people suggest on that--remove the half rib and try to reshap and reinstall? The rest of the rib repairs will probably be backside as the canoe still has good shape and I"d like to retail as much of the original as possible.

    Gut seats...how to restore them? wash good and revarnish? they are still strong, but cakey white and almost sticky.

    Also, it appears this boat may have been originally guild with a keel, there are screws all the way down the center line, but they have ovbiously been cut off and are now flush with the bottom of the boat. Would people install a keel, or leave as is? if I install a keel, whats the best way to blend into the stem bands since there are no outer stems on the boat?

    Thanks everyone, I'm excited to get stated and have some emails out to some local sawmills trying to put materials together.

    stem2.jpg stem3.jpg side1.jpg bottom1.jpg boat2.jpg boat1.jpg
     
  2. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Some more pics....there are some crazy patchwork repairs, and some WIDE planking...

    20210225_092955.jpg 20210225_093011.jpg 20210225_093039.jpg 20210225_093106.jpg 20210225_093122.jpg 20210225_093139.jpg 20210225_093150.jpg
     
  3. Rob Stevens

    Rob Stevens Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Plank repairs are stronger if the span at least 3 ribs.
     
    vtwoodworker likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks, yes, I agree. Those small patches are from the original build from what can figure out. The owner was the original owner and had never recanvassed it or done any repairs.... VERY weird....
     
  5. Dan Lindberg

    Dan Lindberg Ex Wood Hoarder

    This canoe is in better shape than the OT? The OT must be very bad.
    If those patches are original, that doesn't say much for the original builder.
    I'd of passed and waited for a Peternut.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Its not as bad as it looks. IT's Much better than the OT which needs about a dozen ribs, and entire stem, at least 1/3 of the planking, gunwhale repair, deck, seats redone, and about 2 weeks worth of stripping the 1/4 inch of varnish on the interior and green paint on all the exterior woodwork...oh yeah, and canvas...
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2021
    Dan Lindberg likes this.
  7. MGC

    MGC Scrapmaker

    The boat offers a master class in patches of all shapes and sizes. While your eye is drawn to the rectangular (ish) patch that replaced a massive knot you might overlook the little wedged beauty adjacent to the right. Two tacks, one on each end and "Bob's your uncle". I've always tried to make sure to span at least three ribs with a patch or a repair and back splices. This canoe is proof that I've only been doing this for self gratification.
     
    vtwoodworker likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    From everything I see, this boat was built and maintained 100% for functionality. I like it.
     
    MGC likes this.
  9. Fitz

    Fitz Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    I did a big, 20 foot Picard/Huron a number of years ago and the patches were common on that one. I was able to find wide Atlantic White Cedar to replace planking with, but the old wide planking showed a great deal of cupping.
     
    vtwoodworker likes this.
  10. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks, I think I'm just going to replank it with what I can find...probably in the JV patchwork method of its origins.
     
  11. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    pretty easy repairs, and it will paddle just fine. they have a kind of charm as honest, unrefined boats built for use in the bush. their lack of finesse puts some off who prefer or are accustomed to fancier built boats, but you wont feel bad putting dings and scratches on it during use
     
    vtwoodworker, Dan Lindberg and MGC like this.
  12. dtdcanoes

    dtdcanoes LOVES Wooden Canoes

    Well said, Andre ...dings and scratches and half a bloody moose midships would be a perfect day in the bush !
     
    vtwoodworker likes this.
  13. OP
    OP
    vtwoodworker

    vtwoodworker Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Yup. My kind of boat!!! They're made to be used. Its all about functionality.
     

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