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Any idea what type of canoe this is?

Discussion in 'Research and History' started by brishen870, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. OP
    OP
    brishen870

    brishen870 Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Thanks folks. So same region, building style and rot prone material as a Huron?
     
  2. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams all wood nut

    I dunno that I would characterize any canoe built on cedar as "rot prone." I think what might have colored this perception is that canoes such as Faber, Tremblay, and Huron were built to be inexpensive, and thus somewhat disposable. As such, they were not accorded the same level of care that another canoe might have received. It doesn't mean that they were "bad" canoes. The lines are usually nice, and they are a good workman's canoe.

    All that said, and having looked at the pictures you posted, I'd say that your "Canadian Whatsit" is a worthy candidate for restoration, and a re-canvas.

    HTH!
     
  3. OP
    OP
    brishen870

    brishen870 Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    "rot prone" because of water trapping canvas/latex that is. Or so i read. It looked nice when it still had canvas in my childhood. Until it became ratty that is.
     
  4. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    The verolite can do a number on the boat and rots cedar very well. You will recognize it if the top few inches of ribs, along the the rails and planking are soft. Many go this way, but usually only after being stored outside for extended periods. If its been dry stored mostly, and not left wet it should be fine. Traditional canvas of course cures this, as long as it hasnt set it. Hard to argue against fixing a boat for the price of canvas filler and paint if the rest is sound, and you wont feel anxious when using it.
     
  5. Andre Cloutier

    Andre Cloutier Firestarter. Wicked Firestarter.

    The verolite can do a number on the boat and rots cedar very well. You will recognize it if the top few inches of ribs, along the the rails and planking are soft. Many go this way, but usually only after being stored outside for extended periods. If its been dry stored mostly, and not left wet it should be fine. Traditional canvas of course cures this, as long as it hasnt set in. Hard to argue against fixing a boat for the price of canvas filler and paint if the rest is sound, and you wont feel anxious when using it. Its been said the best boats are the ones that get used most, and you'll use this a lot more that any Rushton if you want out on the water. Ask Gil about his most often used boat.....
     
  6. davelanthier

    davelanthier Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    There seems to be some misconceptions about Faber canoes. I have restored quite a few Fabers and consider them one of the best Canadian w/c canoes built. Yes, they were First Nations built but at Loretteville which is just outside of the reserve near where, but not on the reserve at Village de Huron where the Hurons were built. The Faber's were quality built and the construction methods were very different to the Hurons. The construction of the Faber canoes I have worked on were simular too yet far superior to the Chestnuts of the same period. When one compares a 16' Faber Prospector to a 16' Chestnut Prospector their hull design and dimentions are much alike but the Faber Prospector weight is 10 pounds less at 65 lbs. where as the Chestnut Prospector and the 15.5' Huron pleasure model are about 75 pounds each. Faber used Spruce inwales and outwales which may have helped weight wise. I will choose the Faber over the Chestnut hands down. Neither Faber or Huron used Verolite which is a poly coated canvas similar to Naugahide. All Tremblay canoes and a few Chestnuts were covered with Verolite.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  7. OP
    OP
    brishen870

    brishen870 Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Dave, Thanks for the enlightening information. And your boats look great. If you want to trade one for a project let me know:) So Would you say mine is a Faber for sure? In any case I think if a boat was nice looking and made well a faulty canvas could be replaced and not ruin a good boat. But I guess Faber's don't use said canvas so my point is moot. Brishen
     
  8. Kathryn Klos

    Kathryn Klos squirrel whisperer

    Beautiful boats, Dave.

    I like the seats on Fabers-- they seem like works of art. I believe Faber still makes snowshoes.
     
  9. davelanthier

    davelanthier Wooden Canoes are in the Blood

    Brishen, very certain that yours is a Faber. With some proper measurements I can probably confirm and tell you what model it is. FYI; I have a couple of Hurons for sale on the WCHA classified site. Note they have similar babiche seats but the decks are different and the inwales are capped.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    brishen870

    brishen870 Enthusiastic about Wooden Canoes

    Dave, Thanks. I will get those measurements next time I head up north to where the boat is at. I will check out your boats on here. I have close to 10 now however so I doubt I will buy anything else.
     

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